Women Managers in Higher Education: Experiences From the UK


Affiliations

  • University of Sussex, United Kingdom

Abstract

In this paper, case studies of women undertaking middle management positions in a UK university are presented and analysed, within the context of continuing under-representation of women managers in higher education. In-depth interviews were carried out with six women heads, or former heads, of department, in order to obtain their perspectives on their day to day management experiences, longer term strategies and goals, relationships with colleagues and management styles. The women all perceived their greatest strength as people management and collegiality, and gender was embedded in their work in a complex way. Some recommendations for universities to enhance the opportunities for, and status of, women managers are suggested in conclusion.

Keywords

Higher Education, Women Students, Women Academics.

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References

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